Wednesday, May 06, 2009

British Brigadiers

With a few units under my belt I decided to paint a pair of brigadiers for the British. I'm using 50mm diameter washers - a lot of space for little diorama effects. I've seen it many times before, and I like the idea of generals being portrayed 'in action' to create a certain atmosphere, maybe to tell a little story.


First one is a British brigadier to lead the Redcoats into battle. I painted this miniatures as wearing a 'mixed dress': His curled hair is poudered and his coat is laced in blue and gold according to British staff officers' standards. However, the coat is shortened and his hat uncocked.


The brigadier is accompanied by a drummer in the uniform of the 55th Regiment of Foot (who are said to have worn red plumes). This regiment's colonel, James Grant (1720-1802), commanded a brigade of Knyphausen's division at Brandywine. Although critisised for his (arguable) limited abilities as a field officer, Grant was a keen strategist and schemer. Methinks the model's dress, only slightly adapted to campaign conditions, looks just right for such a 'divided' character.


The second brigadier-base started as a pastime. From the very beginning I planned to integrate some "Hessian" units into my AWI collection. Due to public demand I started with the J├Ągerkorps, and more will follow some time in the (not so distant) future. However, since the historical "Hessians" were always led by their own commanders, I needed a Hessian brigadier as well. Thus the idea was born - and a quick bore at Lead Mountain quarried some officers, originally determined to be used along my SYW French...


After playing around for a while, I remembered this wonderful vignette (created by my gaming fellow Tellus) - and I felt enlightened! The scene of an obviously cool-minded brigadier, nearly stricken by a cannonball, and his puzzled companion provided an opportunity to get across the fact, that many Hessian commanding officers were seasoned veterans by the time of the AWI.
One of the oldest was Major-General Johann Daniel Stirn (1712-1779), who had served in the army since the age of 16. He was - among others - present as brigadier in Knyphausen's division at Brandywine. At the Battle of Germantown he received a wound, which led to his retirement and perhaps eventually to his death in1779. Stirn held position of Kommandeur en chef of the Erbprinz regiment, and I painted the miniatures accordingly in blue coats faced crimson. I found it quite difficult to find evidence for the drummer's equipment; hopefully there aren't too many mistakes.


Now, the only thing I need are some Hessian regulars...

All Perry Miniatures, painted in April 2009

10 comments:

Secundus said...

These are lovely, nicely done with loads of character.

Secundus said...

I love the grounded cannon ball with the drummer mopping his brow with relief, a very clever and well thought out base.

Sire Godefroy said...

Thanks, Secundus. :-)
Actually there's already a lot of character in those incredible Perry Miniatures. It does need only limited creativity to bring them "to life". That's also why I love them so ardently.

Cheers

Faust said...

Excellent as usual! Say, any further progress on your TYW figs?

Sire Godefroy said...

Some TYW miniatures were finished, but not yet based. Overall, no real advancements sadly; we are stuck in the development of the campaign system, mainly due to a lack of time (besides painting).

Faust said...

I understand your dilemma all too well. I am dividing my time between finishing my skirmish game, painting figs for said game, and trying to get in some 4th edition D&D.

Giles said...

These really are fantastic little vignettes. A good use, too, of the Hessian figures.

Giles

Anonymous said...

Superb figures!
Theo

Militia Light Dragoon said...

LOL I love it....

Christopher(aka Axebreaker) said...

This is a period I really enjoy and your doing some very nice work here.I hope to see it in person some day.

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